Transition and Finances Part 1: From Student of the Arts to Practicing Artist

header-transitionArt & Money Matters Mondays:

It’s officially Fall 😒. I’m not too excited about it but this seasonal change causes me to think of transition…in my creative life and personal life. I wonder:

Do I have the right resources and support to make it happen?

Am I financially prepared for this transition?

For the next few weeks, I will be blogging about Transition and Finance. I asked fellow artists and creatives for their reflections and will share their responses to the following;  What do you wish you knew or did differently when you transitioned?
– from a student of the Arts to a practicing artist,
– from practicing artist to college or masters student
– from a practicing artist to a professional working artist,
– from a freelancer to a creative business owner

Today’s reflection comes from Marcus Strickland (@marcusstrickland), a tenor and soprano saxophonist of post-bop assurance, (and an) outlet for the millennial soul music in which he also traverses” (NY Times).  For those of you in school or transitioning out to life as a practicing artist, your classmates are your greatest ASSET (a useful or valuable thing, person or quality that can generate cash or turn into savings; it can be tangible or intangible like a trademark)! Your school network can make for a seamless transition from school to the real world. Your classmate’s referrals, experience and connection to other networks can translate into job opportunities (resulting in ready income), instant roommates (resulting in lower rent and living expenses) and potential collaborations (resulting in lower operational costs for your creative business).

“[The transition from school] It was a natural flow of encounters that I later realized was the perfect incubator for my career. By sophomore year at New School I was already part of the [NYC musician] scene and dear friends with many of the successful musicians of today. Our most important connections are our peers, this is what my realization was after the fact. By mere chance I did not really see a definite line between school and career.”

Please share your answers to the same questions.  Your constructive feedback is appreciated.

Have a great week!
Your fellow creative business owner, Tricia M. Taitt

#artandmoneymatters #creativeentrepreneurontherise #artandmoney #thrivingartist

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